Advertisement

Consideration of Neuropsychological Factors in Interviewing

  • Brian P. YochimEmail author
  • Stephanie Potts
Chapter

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to accomplish two purposes: (1) to provide an introduction to neuropsychological factors of which to be aware when conducting diagnostic interviews and (2) to give an introduction to the art and science of conducting neuropsychological assessment interviews. The chapter serves as an overview of how cognitive or brain dysfunction can manifest in a diagnostic interview and also provides an introduction to neuropsychological interviewing for general clinical psychology students or students focusing in clinical neuropsychology. The chapter focuses on neuropsychological assessment with adults. Pediatric neuropsychology will not be explored, but interested readers are referred to Sattler (2008, 2014) for information on assessment interviews with children.

Keywords

Neuropsychology Assessment Interview Diagnosis Dementia 

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-5. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bush, S. S. (2017). APA handbook of forensic neuropsychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Donders, J. (2005). The clinical interview. In S. S. Bush & T. A. Martin (Eds.), Geriatric neuropsychology: Practice essentials (pp. 11–20). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  4. Farias, S. T., Mungas, D., Reed, B. R., Cahn-Weiner, D., Jagust, W., Baynes, K., & DeCarli, C. (2008). The measurement of everyday cognition (ECog): Scale development and psychometric properties. Neuropsychology, 22(4), 531–544.  https://doi.org/10.1037/0894-4105.22.4.531CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Greenwald, A. G., Pratkanis, A. R., Leippe, M. R., & Baumgardner, M. H. (1986). Under what conditions does theory obstruct research progress? Psychological Review, 93, 216–229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Houston, W. S., & Bondi, M. W. (2006). Potentially reversible cognitive symptoms in older adults. In D. K. Attix & K. A. Welsh-Bohmer (Eds.), Geriatric neuropsychology: Assessment and intervention (pp. 103–129). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  7. Johnson-Greene, D., & Inscore, A. B. (2005). Substance abuse in older adults. In S. S. Bush & T. A. Martin (Eds.), Geriatric neuropsychology: Practice essentials (pp. 429–451). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  8. King, J. H., Rolin, S. N., & Frost, R. B. (2017). Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. In S. S. Bush (Ed.), APA handbook of forensic neuropsychology (pp. 201–222). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.  https://doi.org/10.1037/0000032-008CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Larrabee, G. J. (2012). Forensic neuropsychology: A scientific approach (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Lezak, M. D., Howieson, D. B., Bigler, E. D., & Tranel, D. (2012). Neuropsychological assessment (5th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Manly, J. J. (2006). Cultural issues. In D. K. Attix & K. A. Welsh-Bohmer (Eds.), Geriatric neuropsychology: Assessment and intervention (pp. 198–222). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  12. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee of the Head Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. (1993). Definition of mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 8, 86–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Rimel, R. W., Giordani, B., Barth, J. T., & Jane, J. A. (1982). Moderate head injury: Completing the clinical spectrum of brain trauma. Neurosurgery, 11, 344–351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Sattler, J. M. (2008). Assessment of children: Cognitive foundations (5th ed.). San Diego, CA: Jerome M. Sattler, Publisher.Google Scholar
  15. Sattler, J. (2014). Foundations of behavioral, social, and clinical assessment of children (6th ed.). San Diego, CA: Jerome M. Sattler, Publisher.Google Scholar
  16. Segal, D. L., Qualls, S. H., & Smyer, M. A. (2018). Aging and mental health (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Strauss, E., Sherman, E. M. S., & Spreen, O. (2006). A compendium of neuropsychological tests: Administration, norms and commentary (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Teasdale, G., & Jennett, B. (1974). Assessment of coma and impaired consciousness. Lancet, ii, 81–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Vanderploeg, R. D. (2000). Interview and testing: The data collection phase of neuropsychological evaluations. In R. D. Vanderploeg (Ed.), Clinician’s guide to neuropsychological assessment (2nd ed., pp. 3–38). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.VA Saint Louis Health Care SystemSt. LouisUSA

Personalised recommendations