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Dissociative Disorders

  • Tyson D. Bailey
  • Stacey M. Boyer
  • Bethany L. Brand
Chapter

Abstract

Dissociative disorders (DDs) involve a disconnection from the present moment including one’s emotions, body, or surroundings, frequently in an effort to regulate internal states (e.g., emotions, overwhelming levels of physical arousal) during times of heightened stress. The development of a DD has most consistently been associated with antecedent trauma, particularly when exposure happens repeatedly in childhood (Dalenberg et al., 2012, 2014). To further understand DDs, we begin by presenting common symptoms, followed by a discussion of the current diagnostic criteria, prevalence, and difficulties with accurate diagnosis. Further, we discuss strategies for gathering information, including interviews, psychological measures (e.g., self-report and performance-based), and behavioral observations. We conclude with factors to consider when ruling out other diagnoses with similar presentations, such as schizophrenia or borderline personality disorder.

Keywords

Dissociation Assessment Interviewing Psychopathology Trauma 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tyson D. Bailey
    • 1
  • Stacey M. Boyer
    • 2
  • Bethany L. Brand
    • 3
  1. 1.Private PracticeLynnwoodUSA
  2. 2.Christiana Care Health SystemNewarkUSA
  3. 3.Towson UniversityTowsonUSA

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