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Domestic Violence

  • Gloria A. Bachmann
  • Nancy Phillips
  • Janelle Foroutan
Chapter

Abstract

Healthcare providers should include domestic violence questioning in all annual patient encounters as well as in those patient encounters that trigger this questioning. Repeated “accidents,” areas of bruising scattered throughout the patient’s body in various stages of healing, and an over-possessive partner who comes to every medical visit can be red flags for abuse. Although some populations are more at risk for abuse, including the pregnant, elder, and transgender populations, all patients, including males, should be questioned. Adult abuse patients can determine if they want definitive action taken within the criminal and legal system. For children in which there is reported abuse or there is suspected abuse, reporting is mandatory. Abuse not only affects the physical and mental health of the individual but also can lead to more serious medical morbidity and mortality consequences.

Keywords

Domestic violence Intimate partner violence Forms of abuse Clinical presentation Risk factors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gloria A. Bachmann
    • 1
  • Nancy Phillips
    • 1
  • Janelle Foroutan
    • 2
  1. 1.Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of OB/GYN and Reproductive SciencesNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Saint Peter’s University Hospital, Department of OB/GYNNew BrunswickUSA

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