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Opportunistic and Emerging Foodborne Pathogens: Aeromonas hydrophila, Plesiomonas shigelloides, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Brucella abortus

  • Arun K. Bhunia
Chapter
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Opportunistic and emerging pathogens are thought to be involved in large of numbers of foodborne illnesses each year. The biology and the mechanism of pathogenesis of these microbes are not well understood, or their implication as foodborne pathogens have not been fully established. These microbes include but not limited to Aeromonas hydrophila, Brucella abortus, Cronobacter sakazakii, Plesiomonas shigelloides, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter freundii. Pathogenic properties and glimpse on mechanism of pathogenesis and their interaction with the host of the first four pathogens are discussed in this chapter. Continued investigation on the mechanism of the disease process, and prevention and control strategies are needed to reduce human foodborne infections.

Keywords

Aeromonas hydrophila Brucella abortus Cronobacter sakazakii Plesiomonas shigelloides Opportunistic pathogen Emerging pathogen 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arun K. Bhunia
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Food Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Food Science, Department of Comparative PathobiologyPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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