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Interactive Service Design Method: Application to Aircraft Operations at Haneda Airport

  • Kazuo FurutaEmail author
  • Takanori Kaneko
  • Taro Kanno
  • Shigeki Yoshihara
  • Takamichi Mase
Chapter
Part of the Service Science: Research and Innovations in the Service Economy book series (SSRI)

Abstract

The interactive service design method using computer simulation is a powerful approach for service design, because it enables the designer to reflect knowledge of field experts in designing service systems. In this work, we applied this method to ground aircraft operations at a large airport. Ground aircraft operations are a key service for safe and efficient aviation, but serious delays in arrivals or departures as well as unsafe incidents on the ground frequently occur due to increasing air traffic demands. Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) was extended in 2010, and it is planned to increase the airport capacity from 350,000 to 400,000 departures and arrivals per year by 2014. The simulation system used in this work was developed through the interactive design method, where opinions were collected from field experts at each stage of development, and they were considered in modification of the simulation model. The same approach was adopted throughout this study. It will be demonstrated consequently that the interactive service design method is effective to find out problems in a service system and to resolve the problems.

Keywords

Ground aircraft operations Aviation safety Service design Service assessment Interactive design method Agent-based simulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuo Furuta
    • 1
    Email author
  • Takanori Kaneko
    • 1
  • Taro Kanno
    • 1
  • Shigeki Yoshihara
    • 2
  • Takamichi Mase
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Systems InnovationThe University of TokyoBunkyo-kuJapan
  2. 2.ANA Strategic Research Institute Co., Ltd.Minato-kuJapan

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