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Service Engineering Road Map of Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry in Japan

  • Takafumi Kinoshita
  • Kazuaki Ibe
  • Mitsuru KawamotoEmail author
  • Kitayoshi Tsumita
  • Yasuhiro Maeda
Chapter
Part of the Service Science: Research and Innovations in the Service Economy book series (SSRI)

Abstract

In services, “human factors” are more crucial than in manufacturing, and hence, modeling the human functions might be very important. Service engineering can achieve the modeling of the human functions, using engineering approaches. Since service engineering deals with service, which can be provided for customers through employees, its application area includes not only service industries but also manufacturing industries that recently begin to recognize services as an important factor. Almost all the methodologies of service engineering are based on the technologies that can be developed in various fields including the manufacturing industry, and from the special characteristic of the service industry, e.g., human plays an important role. There is a lot of small- and medium-sized enterprises in the service industry and they have some restrictions of resources, then those methodologies require the following features, that is, being useful for observing human behaviors, low cost, convenience for users, high stability, and moreover, the optimization and combination of the methodologies are also important in the research field. The methodologies of service engineering can be arranged by the classification of the following four stages, (1) the observation of human behaviors in service fields (observation), (2) the analysis and modeling of data obtained in the service field (analysis), (3) the redesign of the existing service model through dialogical simulations (design), and (4) the application to the actual service (application). In this chapter, by comprehensively examining the technologies with respect to the four stages, we choose these technologies in the viewpoint of contributing to the improvement of service industries, and then show them as a technical strategy map for service engineering for the next 15 years. The technical strategy map includes some concrete important technical elements in which, for example, there exists a technique that can carry out human resource development, based on the data of the behavior of employees having high skills. In future, we will consider how to widely diffuse these technical elements using, for example, the industry-academic-government collaboration with service industries, consultants, software development companies, research institutes, universities, and government.

Keywords

Service engineering Technical strategy map Ministry of economy trade and industry Human factors Observation Analysis Design Application 

References

  1. The reports of the project of promotion of Service Engineering from Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in 2007. http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g70502aj.html
  2. The reports of the project of promotion of Service Engineering from Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in 2009, 2010, and 2011. https://unit.aist.go.jp/cfsr/contents/meti-top.htm
  3. The strategic technology road maps of Service Engineering from Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in 2008. http://www.meti.go.jp/policy/economy/gijutsu_kakushin/kenkyu_kaihatu/str2008/2_7_2.pdf
  4. The strategic technology road maps of Service Engineering from Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in 2009. http://www.meti.go.jp/policy/economy/gijutsu_kakushin/kenkyu_kaihatu/str2009/7_2.pdf
  5. The strategic technology road maps of Service Engineering from Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in 2010. http://www.meti.go.jp/policy/economy/gijutsu_kakushin/kenkyu_kaihatu/str2010/a7_2.pdf
  6. The website of the Center for Service Research, AIST. http://unit.aist.go.jp/cfsr/en/

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takafumi Kinoshita
    • 1
  • Kazuaki Ibe
    • 1
  • Mitsuru Kawamoto
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kitayoshi Tsumita
    • 3
  • Yasuhiro Maeda
    • 3
  1. 1.Nomura Research Institute, NRITokyoJapan
  2. 2.Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry, METITokyoJapan
  3. 3.National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)TokyoJapan

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