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Mindfulness Training to Promote Self-Regulation in Youth: Effects of the Inner Kids Program

  • Brian M. GallaEmail author
  • Susan Kaiser-Greenland
  • David S. Black
Chapter
Part of the Mindfulness in Behavioral Health book series (MIBH)

Abstract

Mindfulness training offers one approach to promote self-regulation, and potentially, to improve long-term developmental outcomes. Although mindfulness training programs are geared primarily for adults, there have been advancements in the development of programs designed for children and adolescents. In this chapter, we focus on one mindfulness training program called Inner Kids and the impact it might have on self-regulation and other important health constructs. The objectives of this chapter are to define self-regulation and consider its relation to other conceptually similar constructs and its developmental trajectory across childhood and adolescence; provide a brief overview of mindfulness; and offer a discussion of how mindfulness training might promote self-regulation. We then turn to a discussion of Inner Kids, as well as to results of a randomized controlled trial testing the program’s beneficial effect on self-regulation in second- and third-grade children. We conclude with specific recommendations for future research.

Keywords

Mindfulness Meditation Self-regulation Self-control Emotion regulation Executive function Desire Child Adolescent 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian M. Galla
    • 1
    Email author
  • Susan Kaiser-Greenland
    • 2
  • David S. Black
    • 3
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.The Inner Kids ProgramLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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