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Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging

  • Ryotaro KimeEmail author
  • Yasuhisa Kaneko
  • Yoshinori Hongo
  • Yusuke Ohno
  • Ayumi Sakamoto
  • Toshihito Katsumura
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 876)

Abstract

Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/ phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27 ± 1 year, height 169.4 ± 4.1 cm, weight 65.9 ± 8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p < 0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

Keywords

Oxidative metabolism Magnetic resonance spectroscopy Dynamic exercise Quadriceps pH 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful for revision of this manuscript by Andrea Hope. This study was supported in part by Grant-in-Aid for scientific research from the Japan Society for Promotion of Science (24500799) to R. K.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryotaro Kime
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yasuhisa Kaneko
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yoshinori Hongo
    • 3
  • Yusuke Ohno
    • 3
  • Ayumi Sakamoto
    • 2
    • 3
  • Toshihito Katsumura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sports Medicine for Health PromotionTokyo Medical UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Oriental MedicineKuretake College of Medical Arts & SciencesTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Kuretake Medical Clinic, Kuretake College of Medical Arts & SciencesSaitamaJapan

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