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Hypoxia-Associated Marker CA IX Does Not Predict the Response of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancers to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

  • Arnulf MayerEmail author
  • Peter VaupelEmail author
  • Katja Oberholzer
  • Maren Ebert
  • Marc Dimitrow
  • Andreas Kreft
  • Wolfgang Mueller-Klieser
  • Heinz Schmidberger
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 876)

Abstract

Hypoxia-associated proteome changes have been shown to be associated with resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. Our study evaluated the role of the hypoxia-inducible (HIF)-1 target gene carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX in the prediction of the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (stages II and III). A total of 29 pretreatment biopsy specimens were stained for CA IX by immunohistochemistry, converted to digital images and evaluated in a quantitative fashion using image analysis software. Contrary to our expectations, a trend towards a correlation between better tumor regression (>50 %) and higher expression of CA IX (p = 0.056) was found. CA IX was also present more frequently in pathological tumor stage T1 (pT1) tumors (p = 0.048). Conversely, no association with lymph node metastasis was identified. In conclusion, as a single marker, CA IX expression is not able to identify a hypoxia-related treatment resistant phenotype in rectal cancer.

Keywords

Tumor hypoxia Rectal cancer Carbonic anhydrase IX Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy Tumor regression grading 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnulf Mayer
    • 1
    Email author
  • Peter Vaupel
    • 1
    Email author
  • Katja Oberholzer
    • 2
  • Maren Ebert
    • 2
  • Marc Dimitrow
    • 1
  • Andreas Kreft
    • 3
  • Wolfgang Mueller-Klieser
    • 4
  • Heinz Schmidberger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiooncology and RadiotherapyUniversity Medical CenterMainzGermany
  2. 2.Department of Diagnostic and Interventional RadiologyUniversity Medical CenterMainzGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Pathology, University Medical CenterMainzGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical CenterMainzGermany

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