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Chemotherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

  • Quan Li
  • Jack L. Watkins
Chapter

Abstract

Chemotherapy, either used alone or with surgery and/or radiation, plays an important role in the treatment of patients with gynecologic cancer. Common chemotherapy agents used in this group of patients are classified into groups based on pharmacological mechanisms. While many of them share the similar toxicities such as myelosuppression, each agent has its own toxicity profiles. It is often challenging for new providers to understand how these agents are used in different chemotherapy regimens and how to monitor and manage associated toxicities.

This chapter is divided into three sections:
  • The first part discusses the mechanisms, toxicities, and clinical pearls of common chemotherapy agents used in gynecologic oncology. Authors also share clinical pearls of each agent including administration, drug interactions, dosing adjustment, and other tips.

  • The second part of this chapter lists evidence-based chemotherapy regimens to treat common gynecologic cancers including cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, uterine sarcoma, and ovarian cancer based on stage. All references for these regimens are included at the end of the chapter to help providers find the original literature/clinical trial.

  • The third part of this chapter discusses common chemotherapy associated toxicities across various agents. Topics cover chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV), chemotherapy-induced diarrhea, peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), febrile neutropenia (FN), extravasation, and hypersensitivity (HSRs). The authors summarize the background, diagnosis, and evidence-based management approaches for each toxicity.

Keywords

Chemotherapy agents Chemotherapy regimen Chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting Chemotherapy-induced diarrhea Peripheral neuropathy Febrile neutropenia Extravasation Hypersensitivity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy, The James Cancer HospitalThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Department of Clinical EffectivenessUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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