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The Pathophysiology of Obesity and Obesity-Related Diseases

  • Robert W. O’Rourke
Chapter

Abstract

The first half of this chapter addresses the pathophysiology of obesity itself. The chapter discussed the physiologic mechanisms that lead to the obesity phenotype and answers the question, “How do we become obese?” The chapter also discusses the genetic, evolutionary, and environmental forces that have molded these regulatory systems to create the modern obesity epidemic. In doing so, the chapter answers the question, “Why do we become obese?” Because obesity is associated with a wide range of pathology, the second half of the chapter explores the pathophysiology of obesity-related metabolic disease and studies the effects of nutrient excess on cellular metabolism and systemic physiology.

Keywords

Insulin Resistance Adipose Tissue Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Brown Adipose Tissue White Adipose Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Michigan Hospital, University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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