Assistive Technology for Students with Visual Impairments and Blindness

  • Austin M. Mulloy
  • Cindy Gevarter
  • Megan Hopkins
  • Kevin S. Sutherland
  • Sathiyaprakash T. Ramdoss
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

This chapter provides (a) an overview of visual impairments and blindness, (b) explanations, examples, and summaries of research findings on assistive technology-related assessments and assistive technologies for pre-academic learning, reading, writing, mathematics, and science, and (c) discussion of implications of research findings for use of assistive technology with students with visual impairments and blindness. The research summarized suggests the use of assistive technology with students with visual impairments and blindness has the potential to improve many student outcomes related to academics and learning via enhancement of existing sight abilities and/or engagement of other senses (e.g., hearing) and abilities (e.g., oral language). In addition, research findings suggest the extent and quality of assessments are critical determinants of long-term assistive technology implementation outcomes. Discussion of the implications of research findings includes recommendations for practice in assessment, selection of assistive technologies, teaching and encouraging assistive technology use, and prevention of technology abandonment. The chapter concludes with description of areas in need of future research.

Keywords

Visual Acuity Assistive Technology Visual Impairment Reading Rate Screen Reader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Austin M. Mulloy
    • 1
  • Cindy Gevarter
    • 2
  • Megan Hopkins
    • 3
  • Kevin S. Sutherland
    • 4
  • Sathiyaprakash T. Ramdoss
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology Counseling, and Special EducationThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special EducationThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  3. 3.Department of Curriculum and InstructionThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  4. 4.Department of Special Education and Disability Policy, School of EducationVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  5. 5.Department of Special Education and Communication DisordersNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA

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