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Oxidative Stress and Central Regulation of Blood Pressure

  • Yoshitaka HirookaEmail author
  • Kenji Sunagawa
Chapter
Part of the Oxidative Stress in Applied Basic Research and Clinical Practice book series (OXISTRESS)

Abstract

It is well established that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. With regard to oxidative stress, however, much attention has been focused on vascular damage in the process of hypertension. In consecutive studies, we have been investigating the role of brain oxidative stress in the central nervous system control of blood pressure. Indeed, we found that oxidative stress is increased in the brain stem, thereby activating the sympathetic nervous system, leading to hypertension. In this chapter, we describe our series of consecutive studies regarding this issue and supporting reports from other laboratories. Because of the importance of sympathetic activation for hypertensive vascular damage, our concepts not only of the pathogenesis but also the therapeutic aspects of hypertension are worthy of attention.

Keywords

Oxidative stress Blood pressure Hypertension Heart rate Sympathetic nervous system Brain Rostral ventrolateral medulla Reactive oxygen species Metabolic syndrome Heart failure 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The series of studies was supported by Grants-in Aid for Scientific Research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (B193290231, B24390198). The Department of Advanced Cardiovascular Regulation and Therapeutics, Kyushu University is supported by Actelion Pharmaceuticals Ltd (Y.H.).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Advanced Cardiovascular Regulation and Therapeutics, Center for Disruptive Cardiovascular MedicineKyushu UniversityHigashi-ku, FukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Therapeutic Regulation of Cardiovascular Homeostasis, Center for Disruptive Cardiovascular MedicineKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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