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Cerebral palsy and profound retardation

  • P. Eckersley

Abstract

The early development of all children’s behaviour begins with the baby’s motor and sensory responses to the environment. Early physical development and interaction with his or her parents are achieved because the baby is both demanding and responsive, motivated to extend physical capacities and to explore (Sherborne, 1980). Children and adults with profound retardation have responses which are slow to develop, their movements may not follow normal patterns, and they may not initiate involvement and exploration for themselves. An important role of therapy management is to encourage and guide development through enjoyment of, and responsiveness to, movement and sensation.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Therapy Management Stereotyped Movement Profound Impairment Purposeful Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Eckersley

There are no affiliations available

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