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Davisson and Germer and Quantum Physics

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Abstract

Along with the work of Pauling, possibly America’s greatest contributions to the new science of quantum mechanics came from Bell Lab scientists Leslie Germer and Clinton Davisson. Upon graduating from Cornell with honors in 1917, Germer accepted a research post at Western Electric.

Keywords

Helium Atom Wave Mechanic Wave Nature Electron Intensity Quantum Mechanical Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Endnotes

  1. 1.
    Richard K. Gehrenbeck, “Electron Diffraction: Fifty Years Ago,” Physics Today, January 1978 (no primary source given).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    See Jeremy Bernstein, Prophet of Energy: Hans Bethe (E. P. Dutton, New York, 1981), pp. 18–19.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lester H. Germer, “The Structure of Crystal Surfaces,” Scientific American, June 1963.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Notebook entry of February 5, 1925.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    C. J. Davisson, “Are Electrons Waves?” Franklin Institute Journal, 1928, 105:597–623.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Richard K. Gehrenbeck, “Electron Diffraction: Fifty Years Ago,” Physics Today, January 1978.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lester H. Germer, “The Structure of Crystal Surfaces,” Scientific American, June 1963.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    For an excellent discussion of this, see Katherine Russell Sopka, Quantum Physics in America (American Institute of Physics, New York, 1985), Vol. 10, p. 87.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Anthony Serafini 1993

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