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Justice pp 235-268 | Cite as

Public Policy and Justice

Chapter
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Public policy analysis, together with management theory and legal theory, are areas in which intellectual work in the social sciences most directly impinges on practical questions. In all three of these areas the unity of theory and practice is not a slogan of a revolutionary party but the need of everyday (and quite unrevolutionary) experience. This determines the form that interest in justice takes in the policy sciences. There is little concern with metaethics or with philosophical assumptions. There is much concern, on the other hand, with concrete and precise normative recommendations and a reliance greater than in other fields on mathematics and on empirical evidence because of their superior capacity to convince.

Keywords

Distributive Justice Collective Decision Indifference Curve Approval Vote Collective Goal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Government and, PoliticsUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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