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Justice pp 117-151 | Cite as

Sociology and Justice

Chapter
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

Justice is more often an implicit theme than an explicit object of study in sociology. The most obvious causes of this are the strong pressures toward moral relativism and against metaphysical speculation. The effort to comprehend what is, from the point of view of those living it, lends itself to neither absolute judgments nor a unified definition.1

Keywords

Distributive Justice American Sociological Review White Collar Crime Social Standing Social Arrangement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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