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Justice pp 85-116 | Cite as

Political Studies and Justice

Chapter
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

This chapter is about the justice of the new liberalism and disputes about its content and ethical viability. It is the prevalent theory of justice in contemporary Western political thought, not only because of its compelling defense in recent philosophy but also because it captures some of the most confidently held modern-day intuitions about justice. Indeed, the social roots of the liberal conception of justice run so deep it is said that thinkers like Rawls have simply worked up their principles from preexisting attitudes and the legal and moral codes in which they are encapsulated. Allan Bloom (1975, p. 649) writes that “Rawls begins with our moral sense, develops the principles which accord with it, and then sees if we are satisfied with the results,” and Milton Fisk (1975) sees Rawls’s contractualism serving the purpose of conserving the basic institutions of our society—the market economy and liberal democracy.

Keywords

Human Nature Original Position Distributive Justice Liberal Democracy Liberal Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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