Advocacy: Applications in the Early Years of Children

  • G. Ronald Neufeld
Part of the Rehabilitation Education book series (RE)

Abstract

This chapter is written for concerned parents and professionals who wish to improve the availability and quality of services for children from birth to age six by using strategies or approaches commonly known as advocacy. In this chapter, advocacy is defined, an ideology or framework of beliefs and values is proposed, and a variety of advocacy approaches and activities are described. At the outset it is noted that advocacy approaches specifically designed for infants and children during early childhood are almost non-existent. For this reason, recommendations relating to infants and young children draw heavily on advocacy experience gained with adults and school-age children.

Keywords

Developmental Disability Handicapped Child Handicap Child Advocacy Activity Public Awareness Campaign 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© David Mitchell and Roy I. Brown 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Ronald Neufeld

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