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Water, electrolytes, minerals and trace elements

Chapter

Abstract

Water is the basic chemical of life, acting both as a bulk and localized solvent for the body. Water is an angular molecule with two vertical planes of symmetry and is an acceptor and donator of protons. Water freezes at 0°C to form a stable phase (ice) with a variety of structural formations. The chemical potential of ice is much lower than that of liquid water. As water is warmed the structure becomes more open and is at its maximum volume at 4°C. Water molecules are held apart by hydrogen bonds between structures.

Keywords

Dietary Intake Iron Deficiency Zinc Deficiency Natural Abundance Iodine Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further reading

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Copyright information

© Martin Eastwood 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Western General HospitalUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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