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The metabolism of nutrients

Chapter

Abstract

The liver is the largest organ in the body, weighing 1200–1500 g — about 2% of the total weight of an adult. In the infant it is relatively larger and contributes to the characteristic rotund abdomen. The liver is important in the metabolism and storage of nutrients, particularly in that it is the first organ to which nutrients are exposed after absorption from the intestine.

Keywords

Bile Acid Fatty Acid Synthesis Trans Fatty Acid Ketone Body Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martin Eastwood 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Western General HospitalUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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