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Diagnostic Issues in High-Functioning Autism

  • Luke Y. Tsai
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Ever since Kanner (1943) published his first description of autism, views of its etiology and nature have evolved and changed. During the past four decades, in spite of the significant advances in the understanding of autism, disagreements over its validity and definition have never ceased. Lay people are confused by changes of the diagnostic terms and criteria for autism; they worry that different authorities are talking about different disorders when they talk about autistic people. This is particularly true in the borderline cases with near-normal functioning (i.e., high-functioning autism).

Keywords

Autistic Child Asperger Syndrome Tourette Syndrome Autistic Disorder Pervasive Developmental Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luke Y. Tsai
    • 1
  1. 1.Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Service, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Michigan Medical CenterAnn ArborUSA

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