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Hazardous Wastes

  • Robert D. Stephens
Chapter
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Abstract

The safe and economical disposal of hazardous waste is acknowledged to be one of our biggest environmental challenges. Problems relating to the management and disposal of hazardous waste afflict industrial nations throughout the world. It has been estimated that 20 to 24 million metric tons of hazardous waste are generated annually in Europe and another 7 to 8 million metric tons are generated annually from a group of Pacific countries that includes Japan, Australia, and New Zealand (18). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that about 255 to 275 million metric tons of hazardous waste are generated annually in the United States (8). By far the bulk of this waste is generated by the petrochemical industry. It is estimated that the production of synthetic organic chemicals has increased by over 400% since 1940. The EPA estimates that only 10% of all hazardous waste was properly disposed of in the past, most of it having been pumped into unlined lagoons on the generator’s property (33).

Keywords

Hazardous Waste Toxic Waste Hazardous Waste Site Toxic Release Inventory Land Disposal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

  1. Committee on Environmental Epidemiology: Environmental Epidemiology, Vol. 1. Public Health and Hazardous Wastes, National Academy Press, Washington, 1991.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

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  • Robert D. Stephens

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