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Water Pollution and Chemical Contamination in Drinking Water

  • William A. Coniglio
  • Paul S. Berger
  • Joseph A. Cotruvo
Chapter
  • 139 Downloads

Abstract

An ample supply of clean fresh water is essential for the well-being of all organisms. The quality of drinking water, often taken for granted in industrialized nations, is increasingly becoming a matter of concern. The original focus of most water quality improvement programs was on such conventional pollutants as dissolved oxygen, fecal coliform bacteria, suspended sediment, dissolved solids, and phosphorus. Although pathogens in inadequately treated drinking water are still the greatest public health concern related to drinking water, increased industrialization, the widespread use of chemicals in industry and agriculture, and the disposal of large volumes of industrial wastes have drawn attention to the importance of protecting drinking water from contamination with chemical agents. Over 60,000 chemicals are now being used by industry and agriculture. Accordingly, such substances as synthetic organic chemicals, solvents, pesticides, metals, cleaning preparations, and septic tank de-greasers can pollute both surface and ground waters that are sources of drinking water.

Keywords

Drinking Water Ground Water Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Quality Safe Drinking Water 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. Coniglio
  • Paul S. Berger
  • Joseph A. Cotruvo

There are no affiliations available

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