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Governmental Regulation of Exposure to Environmental Chemicals and Physical Agents

  • James M. Kawecki
  • Si Duk Lee
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  • 110 Downloads

Abstract

All over the world, environmental regulations have been promulgated in response to public health problems—often long-brewing problems that suddenly erupted into crises. This has certainly been our historical experience in the United States. The evolution of the government’s regulatory role began in the 19th century. Steamboat boilers were exploding with alarming frequency taking lives and releasing hazardous substances. The public response to this crisis led to the earliest environmental regulations by the United States government.

Keywords

Risk Assessment Quantitative Risk Assessment Hazard Identification Material Safety Data Sheet Toxic Release Inventory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Kawecki
  • Si Duk Lee

There are no affiliations available

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