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Personal Methods of Controlling Exposure to Chemical Contaminants in Drinking Water

  • Frank Bell
  • Ervin Bellack
  • Joseph A. Cotruvo
Chapter
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Abstract

Public water suppliers have a legal responsibility to provide safe drinking water for the public. Consumers have an obligation as well. If their drinking water comes from from an individual well, they have almost all of the responsibility for maintaining the quality of the water. But even if their drinking water comes from a public supply, consumers should be actively interested in the quality of water being delivered and in the problems the water utility may face in providing that water.

Keywords

Drinking Water Reverse Osmosis Public Water Supply Drinking Water Regulation Public Water System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Lykins BW Jr, Clark RM, Goodrich JA: Point-of-Use/Point-of-Entry Water Manual, Lewis Publishers, Chelsea, Michigan, 1991.Google Scholar
  2. National Sanitation Foundation: Listings for Drinking Water Treatment Systems, National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, September 1, 1991.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Bell
  • Ervin Bellack
  • Joseph A. Cotruvo

There are no affiliations available

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