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Chemical Contaminants in Food

  • Sushma Palmer
  • Kulbir S. Bakshi
Chapter

Abstract

Three categories of environmental contaminants generally occur in food: natural and synthetic organic compounds, traces of heavy metal, and certain natural and synthetic radioactive substances (51, 69). This chapter summarizes the sources, occurrence, extent of exposure, and regulation of selected substances belonging to the first two categories, i.e., contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), residues of certain pesticides, traces of toxic metals, components of packaging materials such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and traces of industrial chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

Keywords

Pesticide Residue Food Contamination Vinyl Chloride Monomer Food Contaminant Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocar Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sushma Palmer
  • Kulbir S. Bakshi

There are no affiliations available

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