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Personal Methods of Controlling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution

  • Anthony V. NeroJr.
Chapter

Abstract

Indoor air pollution has been a part of the human condition since humans first began to live indoors. The pollutants found indoors are similar to those found outdoors and in some instances actually come from outdoor sources. In the absence of indoor sources, the concentrations of combustion products are typically somewhat less than those in outdoor air. Yet the pollutants measured in highest concentrations are measured indoors and originate from within buildings. Only in recent years have we become aware of the dimensions of the problem and the relevance of indoor air quality for health. A number of factors combined to produce this awareness: complaints of eye, nose, and throat irritation and other symptoms by occupants of new or recently remodeled office buildings; the presence of deteriorating asbestos in public schools; the problem of radon in homes; and the symptoms evidenced by the occupants of houses insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam.

Keywords

Volatile Organic Compound Environmental Tobacco Smoke Ventilation Rate Indoor Radon Combustion Emission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Godish T: Indoor Air Pollution Control, Lewis Publishers, Boca Raton, 1989.Google Scholar
  2. Nero AV Jr, Gadgil AJ, Nazaroff WW, et al: Indoor Radon and Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies, DOE/ER-048OP, US Department of Energy, Washington, 1990.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony V. NeroJr.

There are no affiliations available

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