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Disorders of the Skin

  • Ronald C. Wester
  • Howard I. Maibach
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  • 110 Downloads

Abstract

By providing a barrier between the body and its physical, chemical, and biological environment, the skin functions as one of the protective organs of the body. Although its barrier properties are impressive, the skin provides a portal of entry and a vulnerable target for many environmental chemicals. There can be, for example, sufficient percutaneous absorption of such substances as aniline dye, cyanide salts, numerous solvents, organophosphates, and other insecticides to produce toxic symptoms (55). Direct exposure of the skin to the vast number of environmental chemicals can result in a wide range of adverse responses. This chapter discusses the adverse effects of such exposure on the skin.

Keywords

Skin Cancer Skin Disease Contact Dermatitis Ozone Layer Allergic Contact Dermatitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

  1. Adams RM (ed.): Occupational Skin Disease, 2nd ed, WB Saunders, Philadelphia, 1990.Google Scholar
  2. Fisher AA: Contact Dermatitis, 3rd ed., Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, 1986.Google Scholar
  3. Maibach HI (ed.): Occupational and Industrial Dermatology, 2nd ed., Year Book Medical Publisher, Chicago, 1987.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald C. Wester
  • Howard I. Maibach

There are no affiliations available

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