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Disorders of the Nervous System

  • John R. Taylor
Chapter

Abstract

The nervous system, in spite of its seemingly protected environment, is vulnerable to the effects of a host of toxins. Although the precise reasons for this vulnerability remain uncertain, the heterogeneity of cell types, the coatings required by many of the axons, and the rich blood supply needed by the metabolically active cells all present opportunities for many toxins to exert a noxious effect. Once attacked, the nervous system repairs itself poorly if at all, and the resulting dysfunction often endures. At times minor neural damage can create noticeable, even disabling, symptoms. Numerous authors have reviewed the effects of neurotoxic exposure (14, 15, 42, 46, 86, 103, 115).

Keywords

Lead Exposure Blood Lead Level Lead Poisoning Toxic Exposure Organic Mercury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

  1. Baker EL, Feldman RG, French JG: Environmentally related disorders of the nervous system. Med Clin North Am 74:325, 1990.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Committee on Neurotoxicology and Models for Assessing Risk, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington, 1992.Google Scholar
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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

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  • John R. Taylor

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