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The Occupational and Environmental Health History

  • Alyce Bezman Tarcher
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years, public understanding of occupational hazards and the extent to which environmental chemical and physical agents can adversely affect health has increased enormously. Figure 11–1 illustrates the complex nature of human exposure to these agents. This awareness has encouraged patients to consult their physicians about the safety of their workplace, home, and community environment and to consider a possible relationship between hazardous exposure and their health status. The importance of discovering environmentally related illness cannot be overemphasized (2,9, 15). Benefits may accrue not only to the patient but also to coworkers and to family members with similar exposures.

Keywords

Health History Nitrogen Dioxide Toxic Exposure Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide Hazardous Waste Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

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  • Alyce Bezman Tarcher

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