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Principles and Scope of Environmental Medicine

  • Alyce Bezman Tarcher
Chapter

Abstract

Human health is determined by the interplay between heredity and the environment. The dimensions of the environment are vast, encompassing all external factors that impinge on humans. Air, water, food, and soil contain chemical, physical, and biological agents some of which are known to be harmful to health. In the past, the major cause of death was bacterial infection. With improved sanitation, biological factors (i.e., infections) pose a much smaller health threat in developed countries. With the microbial threat to health reduced, both medical scientists and clinicians have focused on changes within the body as a major source of disease. Investigators have made fundamental advances in the fields of biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, and surgery, and clinicians have aimed at understanding the patient’s symptoms and signs in terms of biochemical and physiological changes occurring within the body.

Keywords

Risk Assessment Biological Marker Environmental Medicine Toxic Agent Physical Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

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  • Alyce Bezman Tarcher

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