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The Distribution of Late Quaternary Forest Regions in the Northeast

Pollen Data, Physiography, and the Prehistoric Record
  • Denise C. Gaudreau
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Fossil pollen are the primary data on paleovegetational history for the last 100,000 years. Interfacing pollen data with data from other disciplines augments their usefulness for paleoenvironmental interpretation; maps are convenient for interfacing data bases when these data are scaled similarly in space and time (Webb and McAndrews 1976). For example, Dincauze and Mulholland (1977) mapped both pollen and archaeological data for New England to show how past vegetation influenced prehistoric settlement patterns. This paper updates pollen maps for this type of interdisciplinary study. Vegetational distributions for the last 14,000 years are summarized in contoured maps of pollen percentages. The pollen types mapped represent the major vegetational regions in northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. The maps show how pollen distributions reflect vegetational contrasts associated both with latitudinal/longitudinal gradients and with topographic gradients. The topographic patterns in the pollen contours can be used to address paleoecological issues, including aspects of postglacial plant colonization. The topographic patterns also have significance for archaeological studies on human prehistory.

Keywords

Deciduous Forest Pollen Type Pollen Data Pollen Percentage Pollen Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise C. Gaudreau
    • 1
  1. 1.Geology DepartmentSouthampton CollegeSouthamptonUSA

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