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Studies on Bioactive Saponins from Chinese Medicinal Plants

  • Rensheng Xu
  • Weimin Zhao
  • Junping Xu
  • Baoping Shao
  • Guowei Qin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 404)

Abstract

Saponins are oligoglycosides with spirostane, steroid or triterpenoid aglycones as their genins, which constitute an important kind of natural product. Some of them exhibit prominent bioactivities, such as the saponins from Panax ginseng and Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Because of their high polarity and relatively complicated structures, it was time- and sample-consuming work to purify and identify them before the 1980’s. In the past decade, the continuing development of various advanced chromatographic materials and spectroscopic methods have made it possible to isolate and determine the structures of certain minor saponins ocurring only in small quantities in a short time.

Keywords

HMBC Spectrum Sugar Unit Triterpenoid Saponin Linkage Site Chinese Medicinal Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rensheng Xu
    • 1
  • Weimin Zhao
    • 1
  • Junping Xu
    • 1
  • Baoping Shao
    • 1
  • Guowei Qin
    • 1
  1. 1.Shanghai Institute of Materia MedicaChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina

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