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Glycosidases that Convert Natural Glycosides to Bioactive Compounds

  • Chung Ki Sung
  • Geun Hyung Kang
  • Sang Sun Yoon
  • Ik-Soo Lee
  • Dong Hyun Kim
  • Ushio Sankawa
  • Yutaka Ebizuka
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 404)

Abstract

There have been increasing number of scientific reports on the biological activities of the chemical constituents of oriental medicines, including various glycosides. A variety of natural products have been reported to contain a large potential for biological activities that are important for the treatment of human diseases. Unfortunately, the natural products themselves are often either sub-optimal for the desired application or are accompanied by unwanted side effects. Biological transformation often can induce the conversion of an inert substance to a more biologically active compound. The production of new secondary metabolites via biotransformation is an attractive method to lead to valuable derivatization. Thiericke and Rohr (1993) emphasized that biological modifications by use of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could provide several advantages such as regio- and stereoselective reactions, derivatization at various positions, and the psychological advantage of using a natural process.

Keywords

Intestinal Bacterium Ether Linkage Glycyrrhetinic Acid Human Basophil Glycyrrhetic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chung Ki Sung
    • 1
  • Geun Hyung Kang
    • 1
  • Sang Sun Yoon
    • 1
  • Ik-Soo Lee
    • 1
  • Dong Hyun Kim
    • 2
  • Ushio Sankawa
    • 3
  • Yutaka Ebizuka
    • 3
  1. 1.College of PharmacyChonnam National UniversityKorea
  2. 2.College of PharmacyKyunghee UniversityKorea
  3. 3.Faculty of Pharmaceutical ScienceThe University of TokyoTokyo 113Japan

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