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Search for an Endogenous Mammalian Cardiotonic Factor

  • Koji Nakanishi
  • Nina Berova
  • Lee-Chiang Lo
  • Ning Zhao
  • James H. Ludens
  • Adrienne A. Tymiak
  • Bethanne Warrack
  • Garner T. HaupertJr.
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 404)

Abstract

A number of cardiotonic factors have been characterized from the plants Digitalis purpurea, Strophanthus gratus, etc., and from a variety of toads Bufo.1,2 The genin of the plant factors are polyhydroxylated C17-steroids with an α,β-unsaturated γ-lactone attached to C-17 (β) and various sugars attached to C-3 (Fig. 1). The genin of the toad factors (C18 steroids) contains an α-pyrone at C-17 instead of the γ-lactone.

Keywords

Circular Dichroism Circular Dichroism Spectrum HPLC Retention Time Ring Juncture Toad Bufo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koji Nakanishi
    • 1
  • Nina Berova
    • 1
  • Lee-Chiang Lo
    • 1
  • Ning Zhao
    • 1
  • James H. Ludens
    • 2
  • Adrienne A. Tymiak
    • 3
  • Bethanne Warrack
    • 3
  • Garner T. HaupertJr.
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.The Upjohn LaboratoriesKalamazooUSA
  3. 3.Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharm. Res. Inst.PrincetonUSA
  4. 4.Renal Unit Medical Services, Mass. General Hosp.Harvard Medical SchoolCharlestownUSA

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