Electrorheological Properties of Polyaniline Dispersions: Effects of Acid Dopant Concentration

  • Richard M. Webber

Abstract

A typical anhydrous electrorheological (ER) fluid consists of semiconducting particles dispersed in a low conductivity oil. The electrorheological effect refers to the changes in dispersion rheological properties that occur upon application of an electric field across the fluid; the most commonly identified effect being an increase in the stress required to cause flow.

Keywords

Shear Rate Dopant Concentration Interfacial Polarization Dielectric Spectrum Rheological Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard M. Webber
    • 1
  1. 1.The Lubrizol CorporationWickliffeUSA

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