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Twelve Themes and Spiritual Steps

A Recovery Program for Survivors of Traumatic Experiences
  • Joel Osler Brende
Part of the The Springer Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Trauma has become too commonplace in America. Violent street crime permeates large cities. Intergang warfare and wanton shootings invade many ghettos. Robberies, assaults, and rapes (Roth & Lebowitz, 1988) occur frequently, hanging like a gray cloud hovering over the vulnerable who venture alone into side streets, parking lots, and parks (USA Today, 1989). The rising rate of alcohol and drug addiction breeds destruction and self-destruction. And now there is a frightening increase in the use and abuse of cocaine and associated crime, gang warfare, and hired assassinations.

Keywords

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Experience Suicidal Thought Destructive Behavior Alcoholic Anonymous 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel Osler Brende
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Regional Psychiatric DivisionCentral State HospitalMilledgevilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryMercer University School of MedicineMaconUSA

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