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A Metric Measure for Comparing Sequence Alignments

  • Hugh B. NicholasJr.
  • Alexander J. Ropelewski
  • David W. DeerfieldII
  • Joseph G. Behrmann

Abstract

An important goal in sequence analysis is to identify features in sequence alignments that are reflections of the evolutionary history of the sequences rather than artifacts of the alignment method. We have developed a new measure for determining a distance between sequence alignments that will assist us in reaching this goal. We apply this new measure to alignments produced by three different sequence alignment programs and an alignment created by structural superposition.

Keywords

Multiple Sequence Alignment Alignment Score Aspartyl Protease Path Graph Multiple Sequence Alignment Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh B. NicholasJr.
    • 1
  • Alexander J. Ropelewski
    • 1
  • David W. DeerfieldII
    • 1
  • Joseph G. Behrmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Pittsburgh Supercomputing CenterPittsburghUSA

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