Smoking and Smoking Cessation

Current Conceptualizations and Directions for Future Research
  • Margaret DeBon
  • Robert C. Klesges
Part of the Springer Series in Rehabilitation and Health book series (SSRH)

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is the number one preventable cause of death in the United States. Smoking is a major contributor to risk of heart disease, malignant neoplasms, and stroke, the three leading causes of death in the United States (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1987). Recent estimates indicate that smoking accounts for at least 400 thousand premature deaths each year and causally relates to 170 thousand deaths from cardiovascular disease, 130 thousand deaths from cancer, and 50 thousand deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1988; U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1979). Of most recent concern is the effect of passive smoking, which may account for up to 53 thousand nonsmoker deaths per year (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1986).

Keywords

Smoking Cessation Human Service Smoking Behavior Withdrawal Symptom Behavioral Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret DeBon
    • 1
  • Robert C. Klesges
    • 1
  1. 1.The Universities Prevention Center, Department of PsychologyUniversity of MemphisMemphisUSA

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