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Theoretical Models Applied to AIDS Prevention

  • Janet S. St. Lawrence
  • Ted L. Brasfield
  • Kennis Jefferson
  • Edna Alleyne
Part of the Springer Series in Rehabilitation and Health book series (SSRH)

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) offer an unprecedented challenge to psychologists. When researchers first identified the underlying cause of the epidemic as a retrovirus, it was apparent that behavior change would be the only means of curtailing HIV infection for literally years into the future while biomedical research searched for a vaccine or cure. AIDS is now well into its second decade, and behavioral methods remain the cornerstone of prevention efforts. Because of the retrovirus’s complex properties, biomedical solutions are slow to emerge and behavioral prevention remains at the forefront of efforts to interrupt the escalating spread of HIV infection and AIDS. For the first time in recorded history, psychologists, rather than biomedical professionals, are the key response to an epidemic. Psychologists can respond through behavior-change interventions on an individual, group, or community level; by altering the social stigma attached to these diseases through attitude-change programs; and by consultation with health educators, health-care providers, public health specialists, and policy-making bodies to aid in translating the scientific database into sound programs and policies.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Risky Behavior Social Marketing Health Belief Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet S. St. Lawrence
    • 1
  • Ted L. Brasfield
    • 1
  • Kennis Jefferson
    • 1
  • Edna Alleyne
    • 1
  1. 1.Community Health ProgramJackson State UniversityJacksonUSA

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