Advertisement

Cancer Rehabilitation

Concepts and Interventions
  • James C. Gilchrist
  • Blaine L. Block
Part of the Springer Series in Rehabilitation and Health book series (SSRH)

Abstract

The number of individuals who receive cancer diagnoses continues to increase each year. In 1986, there were approximately 930 thousand new cases of cancer (Kurtz-man, Gardner, & Kellner, 1988). The estimated number of new cancer patients in 1995 is expected to be about 1,252,000 (Wingo, Tona, & Bolden, 1995). Although research data continue to show a trend of a steadily increasing number of individuals diagnosed with cancer, there has also been an increase in the number of individuals expected to survive 5 years or more. The increase in the number of cancer survivors is a result of early diagnosis and ongoing improvements in available treatment modalities (Loescher, Welch-McCaffrey, Leigh, Hoffman, & Meyskens, 1989). At this time, approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with cancer will survive at least 5 years. In contrast, in 1960, about one patient in three survived 5 years or more (Wingo et al., 1995; Ganz, 1990).

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Cancer Survivor Team Member Care Coordinator Rehabilitation Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Cancer Society. (1983). Cancer facts and figures. New York: Author.Google Scholar
  2. Argerakis, G. P. (1990). Psychosocial considerations of the post-treatment of head and neck cancer patients. Dental Clinics of North America, 34(2), 285–305.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Auchincloss, S. (1990). Sexual dysfunction in cancer patients: Issues in evaluation and treatment. In J. C. Holland & J. H. Rowland (Eds.), Handbook of psychooncology (pp. 383–412). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Baldonado, A., & Stahl, D. (1982). Cancer nursing. New York: Medical Examination Publishing.Google Scholar
  5. Blanchard, C. G., Ruckdeschel, J. C., Cohen, R. E., Shaw, E., McSharry, J., & Horton, J. (1981). Attitudes towards cancer: I. The impact of a comprehensive oncology course on second year medical students. Cancer, 47, 2756–2762.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bond, M. R. (1985). Cancer pain: Psychological substrates and therapy. Clinical Journal of Pain, 1, 99–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bonica, J. J. (1985). Treatment of cancer pain: Current status and future needs. Advances in Pain Research and Therapy, 9, 589–616.Google Scholar
  8. Bordieri, J., & Drehmer, D. (1988). Causal attribution and the hiring recommendations for disabled job applicants. Rehabilitation Psychology, 33, 239–247.Google Scholar
  9. Bordieri, J. E., Drehmer, D. E., & Taricone, P. F. (1990). Personnel selection bias for job applicants with cancer. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 20(5), 244–253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Breitbart, W., & Holland, J. C. (1990). Head and neck cancer. In J. C. Holland & J. H. Rowland (Eds.), Handbook of Psychooncology (pp. 232–239). New York: Oxford.Google Scholar
  11. Brooks, A. (1979). Public and professional attitudes toward cancer: A view from Great Britain. Cancer Nursing, 2, 453–459.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Cassileth, B. R., & Egan, T. A. (1979). Modification of medical students perceptions of the cancer experience. Journal of Medical Education, 54, 797–802.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Clark, R. L., Moreton, R. D., Healey, J. E., & MacDonald, E. J. (1967). Rehabilitation of the cancer patient. Cancer, 20, 839–845.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Cohen, R. E., Ruckdeschel, J. C., Blanchard, C. G., Rohrbaugh, M., & Horton, J. (1982). Attitudes towards cancer: II. A comparative analysis of cancer patients, medical students, medical residents, physicians and cancer educators. Cancer, 50, 1218–1223.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Conti, J. V. (1990). Cancer rehabilitation: Why can’t we get out of first gear? Journal of Rehabilitation, 56(4), 19–22.Google Scholar
  16. Cooper, C. L., & Watson, M. (1991). Cancer and stress: Psychological, biological and coping studies. Chichester, UK: Wiley.Google Scholar
  17. Cooper, S., Bean, G., Alpert, R., & Baum, J. (1980). Medical student attitudes toward cancer. Journal of Medical Education, 55, 434–439.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Cromes, G. F. (1978). Implementation of interdisciplinary cancer rehabilitation. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 21, 230–237.Google Scholar
  19. DeLisa, J. A., Martin, G. M., & Currie, D. M. (1988). Rehabilitation medicine: Past, present and future. In J. A. DeLisa, D. M. Currie, B. M. Gans, P. F. Gatens, J. A. Leonard, & M. C. McPhee (Eds.), Rehabilitation medicine: Principles and practice (pp. 3–24). Philadelphia: Lippincott.Google Scholar
  20. DeLisa, J. A., Miller, R. M., Melnick, R. R., Mikulic, M. A., & Gerber, L. H. (1985). Rehabilitation of the cancer patient. In V. T. DeVita, S. A. Rosenberg, & S. Hellman (Eds.), Cancer: Principles and practice of oncology (pp. 2155–2188). Philadelphia: lippincott.Google Scholar
  21. Dent, O., & Gouldton, K (1982). Community attitudes to cancer. Journal of Biosocial Science, 14, 359–372.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Dietz, J. H. (1981). Rehabilitation oncology. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  23. Dudas, S. (1984). Rehabilitation concepts of nursing. Journal of Enterostomal Therapy, 11, 6–15.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Dudas, S., & Carlson, C. E. (1988). Cancer rehabilitation. Oncology Nursing Forum, 15(2), 183–188.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Fobair, R., Hoppe, R. T., Bloom, J., Cox, R., Varghese, A., & Speigel, D. (1986). Psychosocial problems among survivors of Hodgkin’s disease. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 4, 805–814.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Ganz, P. A. (1990). Abolishing the myths: The facts about cancer. In F. Mullan & B. Hoffman (Eds.), An almanac of practical resources for cancer survivors (pp. 7–30). Mt. Vernon, NY: Consumers Union.Google Scholar
  27. Gilbert, R. W., Kim, J. H., & Posner, J. R. (1979). Epidural spinal cord compression from metastatic tumor: Diagnosis and treatment. Annals of Neurology, 3, 40–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Grauss, F., Rodgers, L E., & Posner, J. B. (1985). Cerebrovascular complications in patients with cancer. Medicine, 64, 16–35.Google Scholar
  29. Grzesiak, R. C. (1987). Psychological considerations in rehabilitation of the cancer patient. In M. G. Eisenberg & R. C. Grzesiak (Eds.), Advances in clinical rehabilitation (Vol. 1, pp. 268–288). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  30. Gunn, A. E. (1984). Cancer rehabilitation. New York: Raven.Google Scholar
  31. Haley, H. B., Huynh, H., Paiva, R. E., & Juan, I. R. (1977). Students attitudes towards cancer: Changes in medical school. Journal of Medical Education, 52, 500–507.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  32. Harvey, R. F., Jellinek, H. M., & Habeck, R. V. (1982). Cancer rehabilitation: An analysis of 36 program approaches. Journal of the American Medical Association, 247(15), 2127–2131.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Herring, D., King, A. I., & Connelly, M. (1987). New rehabilitation concepts in the management of radial neck dissection syndrome: A clinical report. Physical Therapy, 67(7), 1095–1099.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Hirch, D., Grabois, M., & Decker, N. (1988). Rehabilitation of the cancer patient. In J. A. DeLisa, D. M. Currie, B. M. Gans, P. F. Gatens, J. A. Leonard, & M. C. McPhee (Eds.), Rehabilitation medicine: Principles and practice (pp. 660–670). Philadelphia: Lippincott.Google Scholar
  35. Hoffman, B. (1990). Taking care of business: Employment insurance and money matters. In F. Mullan & B. Hoffman (Eds.), An almanac of practical resources for cancer survivors (pp. 97–149). Mt. Vernon, NY: Consumers Union.Google Scholar
  36. Holland, J., & Wellisch, D. (1988). Psychosocial issues and cancer. CA-A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 38(31), 130–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Holland, J. C., & Rowland, J. H. (1990). Handbook of psychooncology: Psychosocial care of the patient with cancer. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Jameson, R. M. (1974). Prolonged survival in paraplegia due to metastatic spinal tumor. Lancet, 8, 1209–1211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Kaplan, R. S., & Wiernik, R. H. (1982). Neurotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs. Seminars in Oncology, 9, 103–128.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Kurtzman, S. H., Gardner, B., & Kellner, W. S. (1988, June). Rehabilitation of the cancer patient. American Journal of Surgery, 155, 791–803.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Lebovitz, A., Croen, M., & Goetzel, R. (1984). Attitudes towards cancer: Development of the cancer attitude questionnaire. Cancer, 54, 1124–1129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Lehmann, J. F., DeLisa, J. A., Warren, C. G., deLateur, B. J., Bryant, P. L., & Nicholson, C. G. (1978). Cancer rehabilitation: Assessment of need, development, and evaluation of a model of care. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 59, 410–419.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Loescher, L J., Welsh-McCaffrey, D., Leigh, S. A., Hoffman, B., & Meyskens, F. L. (1989). Surviving adult cancers. Part 1: Physiological effects. Annals of Internal Medicine, 111(5), 411–432.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Manon, S. M., Celia, D. F., & Donovan, M. I. (1990). Psychosocial adjustment to recurrent cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum, 17(3), 49–52.Google Scholar
  45. Marcone, R. C. (1978). En bloc resections for osteogenic sarcoma. Cancer Treatment Reports, 62, 225–231.Google Scholar
  46. Mayer, D. K. (1991). Rehabilitation of the person with cancer. Recent Results in Cancer Research, 121, 437–441.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Mayer, D., & O’Connor, L. (1989). Rehabilitation of persons with cancer: An ONS position statement. Oncology Nursing Forum, 16(3), 433.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  48. McKenna, J. P., Fornataro-Clerici, L M., McMenamin, P. G., & Leonard, R. J. (1991). Laryngeal cancer: Diagnosis, treatment and speech rehabilitation. American Family Practice, 44, 123–129.Google Scholar
  49. Mellette, S. J. (1985). The cancer patient at work. CA-A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 35(6), 360–372.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Melvin, J. L (1980). Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary activities and ACRM. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 61, 379–380.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  51. Mullan, F. (1985). Seasons of survival: Relections of a physician with cancer. New England Journal of Medicine, 313, 270–273.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Mullan, F. (1990). Survivorship: An idea for everyone. In F. Mullan & B. Hoffman (Eds.) An almanac of practical resources for cancer survivors (pp. 1–4). Mt. Vernon, NY: Consumers Union.Google Scholar
  53. Mullan, F., & Hoffman, B. (Eds). (1990). An almanac of practical resources for cancer survivors. Mt. Vernon, NY: Consumers Union.Google Scholar
  54. Murray, P. K. (1985). Functional outcome and survival in spinal cord injury secondary to neoplasia. Cancer, 55, 197–201.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Patchell, R. A., & Posner, J. B. (1990). Cancer and the nervous system. In J. C. Holland and J. H. Rowland (Eds.), Handbook of psychooncology (pp. 327–341). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  56. Rothberg, J. S. (1981). The rehabilitation team: Future directions. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 62, 407–410.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  57. Rowland, J. H. (1990a). Intrapersonal resources: Coping. In J. C. Holland & J. H. Rowland (Eds.), Handbook of psychooncology (pp. 44–57). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  58. Rowland, J. H. (1990b). Interpersonal resources: Social support. In J. C. Holland & J. H. Rowland (Eds.), Handbook of psychooncology (pp. 58–71). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  59. Rowland, J. H. (1990c). Developmental stage and adaptation: Adult model. In J. C. Holland & J. H. Rowland (Eds.), Handbook of psychooncology (pp. 25–47). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  60. Scanlon, E. F., & Feldman, J. L (1988). Rehabilitation of the breast cancer patient. Seminars in Surgical Oncology, 4, 268–273.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Schaefer, S. D., & Johns, D. F. (1982). Attaining functional esophageal speech. Archives of Otolaryngology, 108, 647–649.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Schag, C., & Heinrich, R. (1986). The impact of cancer on daily living: A comparison with cardiac patients and healthy controls. Rehabilitation Psychology, 31, 157–167.Google Scholar
  63. Shedd, D. P. (1982). Cancer of the head and neck. In J. F. Holland & E. Frei (Eds.), Cancer medicine (2nd ed., pp. 167–185). Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  64. Shedd, D. P., & Aguilar-Markulis, N. V. (1987). Rehabilitation of the cancer patient. In S. Ariyan (Ed.), Cancer of the head and neck (pp. 785–789). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.Google Scholar
  65. Silverberg, E., Boring, C. C., & Squires, T. S. (1990). Cancer statistics for 1990. CA-A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 40, 9–26.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Stark, R. J., Henson, R. A., & Evans, S. J. (1982). Spinal metastases: A retrospective survey from a general hospital. Brain, 105, 189–213.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Taylor, C. M. (1984). The rehabilitation of persons with cancer: Is this the best we can do? Journal of Rehabilitation, 50(4), 60–71.Google Scholar
  68. Taylor, C. M., & Crisler, J. R. (1988). Concerns of persons with cancer as perceived by cancer patients, physicians and rehabilitation counselors. Journal of Rehabilitation, 54(1), 23–27.Google Scholar
  69. Taylor, S. E., Lichtman, R. P., Wood, J. V., Bluming, A. Z., Dosik, G. M., & Liebovitz, R. L (1985). Illness-related and treatment-related factors in psychological adjustment to breast cancer. Cancer, 55, 2506–2513.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Watson, P. G. (1986). Rehabilitation philosophy: A means of fostering a positive attitude toward cancer. Journal of Enterostomal Therapy, 13, 153–156.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  71. Watson, P. G. (1990). Cancer rehabilitation: The evolution of a concept. Cancer Nursing, 13(1), 2–12.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Welch-McCaffrey, D., Hoffman, B., Leigh, S. A., Loescher, L. J., & Meyskens, F. L. (1989). Surviving adult cancers. Part 2: Psychosocial implications. Annals of Internal Medicine, 111(6), 517–524.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Wellisch, D. K. (1987). Surviving and its effects of the family. In Proceedings of the Fifth National Conference on Human Values and Cancer (pp. 59–62). San Francisco: American Cancer Society.Google Scholar
  74. Wells, R. J. (1990). Rehabilitation: Making the most of time. Oncology Nursing Forum, 17(4), 503–507.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  75. Wingo, P. A., Tong, T., & Bolden, S. (1995). Cancer statistics, 1995. CA-A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 45(1).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • James C. Gilchrist
    • 1
  • Blaine L. Block
    • 2
  1. 1.St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center, St. Elizabeth Medical CenterDaytonUSA
  2. 2.St. Elizabeth Regional Cancer CenterDaytonUSA

Personalised recommendations