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Assessment and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

  • Daniel N. Allen
  • Anthony J. Goreczny
Part of the Springer Series in Rehabilitation and Health book series (SSRH)

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects approximately 250 thousand individuals living in the United States or about 50 to 60 individuals per 100 thousand (Maloney, 1985; National Institutes of Health, 1984). The majority of individuals with MS are between the ages of 15 and 50 and typically experience initial symptoms of the disorder between the ages of 25 and 35. Females have a disproportionately higher rate of MS than do males; some reports indicate that approximately twice as many women as men have a diagnosis of MS (Kurtzke, 1983a; Sibley, Bamford, & Clark, 1984). MS also appears related to race; for example, there is a lower frequency of the disorder in Japanese-Americans and in Japan (Kurtzke, 1983a).

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Cognitive Deficit Sexual Dysfunction Expand Disability Status Scale Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel N. Allen
    • 1
  • Anthony J. Goreczny
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHighland Drive Veterans Affairs Medical CenterPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Highland Drive Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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