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Exercise and Physical Activity

  • Patricia M. Dubbert
  • Barbara A. Stetson
Part of the Springer Series in Rehabilitation and Health book series (SSRH)

Abstract

Psychologists working in health promotion and rehabilitation settings can often use their evaluation and intervention skills to help individuals adopt and maintain healthier lifestyles, including increased physical activity. Their expertise in theories and methods of behavior change can also make an important contribution to the design and implementation of specialized exercise and physical activity programs for high-risk groups and even entire communities. We begin this chapter with a brief discussion of physical activity behavior in the United States today and its importance in public health. We describe methods of assessing health-related physical activity and exercise that can be useful in different settings and applications. We briefly describe two behavioral models we believe will lead to improved exercise-promotion interventions. In the final two sections, we briefly present examples of interventions to increase physical activity and discuss physical activity promotion in groups that have until recently received little attention from researchers in this area: minorities, women, and the elderly.

Keywords

Physical Activity Physical Fitness Behavioral Medicine Transtheoretical Model Physical Activity Promotion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia M. Dubbert
    • 1
  • Barbara A. Stetson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVeterans Affairs Medical Center, and University of Mississippi School of MedicineJacksonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyIllinois Institute of TechnologyChicagoUSA

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