Licensing and Certification

  • Tommy T. Stigall

Abstract

The maturing of psychology as a profession is reflected in the widespread and rapid enactment of psychology laws by state legislatures, particularly during the decade of the 1960s when fully half of the states and six Canadian provinces adopted regulatory statutes. The first state to enact such legislation was Connecticut in 1945, followed in 1946 by Virginia, and by Kentucky in 1948. The last dozen states to pass psychology licensing or certification laws have done so since 1970, with Missouri completing the roster in 1977.

Keywords

Professional Practice American Psychological Association Health Service Provider Psychological Service Professional Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tommy T. Stigall
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana Department of Health and Human ResourcesState Office of Mental Health and Substance AbuseBaton RougeUSA

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