Fatigue pp 515-525 | Cite as

Neurobiology of Muscle Fatigue

Advances and Issues
  • S. C. Gandevia
  • R. M. Enoka
  • A. J. McComas
  • D. G. Stuart
  • C. K. Thomas
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 384)

Abstract

In reading this volume one should ask what is new and true, and what will lead to new approaches and insight. Clearly, as the topic muscle fatigue is increasingly studied by muscle physiologists, neuroscientists and clinicians, it becomes more difficult to summarize the state of knowledge, even in a volume with 36 chapters. Since a major symposium on the physiology of muscle fatigue in London in 1980 (Porter & Whelan, 1981), much progress has been made in understanding both the intracellular, muscle-fiber mechanisms and, to some extent, mechanisms of CNS control as they relate to muscle fatigue. Some of this progress has been summarized at recent symposia in Paris in 1990 (Atlan et al., 1991 ), and Amsterdam in 1992 (Sargeant & Kernell, 1993). Despite this, we are far from having an equation that will predict the degree of fatigue under a variety of physiological circumstances, although some of the boundary conditions are becoming well established.

Keywords

Motor Unit Muscle Fatigue Eccentric Exercise Central Fatigue Single Muscle Fiber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Gandevia
    • 1
  • R. M. Enoka
    • 2
  • A. J. McComas
    • 3
  • D. G. Stuart
    • 4
  • C. K. Thomas
    • 5
  1. 1.Prince of Wales Medical Research InstituteSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biomedical SciencesMcMaster University HamiltonOntarioCanada
  4. 4.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Arizona College of MedicineTucsonUSA
  5. 5.The Miami Project to Cure ParalysisUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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