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Fatigue pp 29-43 | Cite as

Myofibrillar Fatigue versus Failure of Activation

  • K. A. P. Edman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 384)

Abstract

Two principal mechanisms underlying fatigue of isolated muscle fibers are described: failure of activation of the contractile system and reduced performance of the myofibrils due to altered kinetics of crossbridge function. The relative importance of these two mechanisms during development of fatigue is discussed.

Keywords

Isometric Force Moderate Fatigue Intracellular Acidification Tetanic Force Contractile System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. A. P. Edman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of LundLundSweden

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