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Fatigue pp 11-25 | Cite as

The Scientific Contributions of Brenda Bigland-Ritchie

  • C. K. Thomas
  • R. M. Enoka
  • S. C. Gandevia
  • A. J. McComas
  • D. G. Stuart
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 384)

Abstract

Brenda Bigland-Ritchie has made seminal contributions to our understanding of skeletal muscle physiology - the energy cost of muscle when it shortens or is forcibly stretched, the relationship between EMG and force, the behavior of single motor units, and above all, the processes underlying neuromuscular fatigue. More than this, she has stimulated inquiry into the search for reflex mechanisms which may serve to balance the activity of the spinal cord with that of the fatiguing muscles. Her use of human volunteers for much of this work is extraordinary, and represents a major strength. Equally important are her well known and widely cited manuscripts. Not only are her findings clearly described and depicted, but every attempt is made to relate her results to the fatigue processes measured in animal or isolated tissue preparations.

Keywords

Firing Rate Motor Unit Maximal Voluntary Contraction Muscle Fatigue Voluntary Contraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. K. Thomas
    • 1
  • R. M. Enoka
    • 2
  • S. C. Gandevia
    • 3
  • A. J. McComas
    • 4
  • D. G. Stuart
    • 5
  1. 1.The Miami Project to Cure ParalysisUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Prince of Wales Medical Research InstituteRandwickAustralia
  4. 4.Department of Biomedical SciencesMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  5. 5.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Arizona College of MedicineTucsonUSA

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