Post-Heparin Lipolytic Activities in Chronic Renal Failure Patients in Relation to Plasma Triglycerides

  • Ali Abdallah
  • Maria Pascual de Zulueta
  • Pascale Richard
  • Denise Higueret
  • André Cassaigne
  • Albert Iron
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 266)

Abstract

Chronic renal failure (CRF) is responsible for several abnormalities of lipoprotein metabolism and represents an increased risk of atherosclerosis [1,2]. Hypertriglyceridemia is very often observed in patients suffering from terminal CRF, treated by hemodialysis or not, while plasma cholesterol is either normal or slightly elevated. Among the numerous risk factors presented by uremic patients, it is not easy to know precisely the role of hypertriglyceridemia. The general increase in all the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins is a consequence of their impaired metabolism.

Keywords

Chronic Renal Failure Lipoprotein Lipase Uremic Patient Lipoprotein Lipase Activity Chronic Renal Failure Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ali Abdallah
    • 1
  • Maria Pascual de Zulueta
    • 1
  • Pascale Richard
    • 1
  • Denise Higueret
    • 1
  • André Cassaigne
    • 1
  • Albert Iron
    • 1
  1. 1.Département de Biochimie Médicale et Biologie MoléculaireUniversité de Bordeaux 2Bordeaux CédexFrance

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