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Interactions between Pesticides and Esterases in Humans

  • C. H. Walker
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 266)

Abstract

The toxicity of many pesticides is dependent upon their interaction with various types of esterase. Indeed esterases have an important role in determining the selective toxicity of certain insecticides [1–3]. A particular case of this is the development of resistance to insecticides by insects. For example, strains of the aphid Myzus persicae which are resistant to organophosphorus insecticides (ops), have very high levels of a carboxylesterase, which can detoxify the active oxon forms of these compounds [4,5].

Keywords

Esterase Activity Organophosphorus Insecticide Neuropathy Target Esterase Carbamate Insecticide Experimental Toxicology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Animal and Microbial Sciences Department of Biochemistry & PhysiologyUniversity of ReadingReading, BerksUK

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